Post, Mary Robbins. Letter to Isaac Post.

DESCRIPTION:

Handwritten letter from Mary Robbins Post to Isaac Post, August 23, 1863.

DATE:

August 23, 1863

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TRANSCRIPTION:

8 mo 23/63
Dearly Beloved
          On the receipt of your truly
acceptable letter I felt just like answering it im
-mediately and should have done so had not my duty
to a sick and suffering sister come in the way
(Sally Ann Bond who was yesterday released from
her great suffering cancer and dropsy) I wanted
to prepare things for her and then to go there and
the next day I accompanied J who was at work
getting hay at Roslin [sic] to see Sarah Mott found
her pretty comfortable but been very poorly since
you were there had quite a pleasant visit and
was glad if I had contributed to her happiness
Then to James Motts  Elizabeth at home and well
but I thought not feeling quite as cheerful
as sometimes  I took all your letters received
since your return and read to her and we
recounted all the pleasant memories of your
visit she said it was unusually pleasant to
her and I tried to urge the necessity for
her happiness to mingle more with her friends
and neighbors  Miss Crapon was there spending
(Page 2)
a few days and E said she was sorry to let her go alone
making calls but (she excused herself from going with her)
but really she felt but little inclination she has staid [sic]
at home so much that it is irksome to exert herself suff
-icently I told her I knew well the feeling but almost alw
ays I felt the better for going and mingling with my
neighbors and even that very afternoon I almost regretted
having spoken about going  She was supprised [sic] to hear I ever
felt so  I do not think she feels much better reconciled to
her present home than at first says it has increased
their cares and she would gladly lessen them and
live in a very small way James was at Great Neck moving
a building but I did not think of making so long a story
out of my reason for not replying immediately and when
the right time passes over we may not see the necessity as
much then M[onthly] M[eeting] at Matinecock and Jericho both of which we
attended at [ours?] R H was exercised on ac[coun]t of the growing sentime
-nt among friends of doubting & reasoning on parts of the scriptures
the miracles and other parts incomprehensible to us  the Jewish
law was adapted to the state of the people at that time and
even now we saw ample illustration that there were those
who could only be controled [sic] by the force system that God was
able now to raise the dead &c &c that we had even considered
them as secondary quoting Barclay who she believed was a
standard work on all except original sin & the atonement
our part of society could not acknowledge she was quite leng
thy and it seemed to me she labored for very little profit
seldom has it seemed so clear the desired object was not
attained after all her exercise soon after she took her
seat Stimonson rose spoke of Jesus of his life of obedience
to all the requirements of his day that he often said it
(Page 3)
was often said by those of old times thus and so quoting
but I say onto you lose your enemies &c &c he imposed no
burdens on his followers but that they should come into the
childlike teachable state of obedience to the will of their heave
-nly father that it was not well to look back but to press forward
Edmund followed in quite a hopeful strain that he had felt
encouraged in meeting so large a number and so many young
people spoke of the evils wh[ich] were laying waste the community
intemperance & other evils abounded and we ought to be
[alive?] and in earnest to maintain a faithful testimony against
evil in all its many ramifications that we might leave the
world better for having lived in it &c  went to Henry Titus to
dine 18 of us accepted of their hospitality at Jericho the meeting
was small our girls said there were only 9 females of that [P?] Meeting
and fewer from the other meetings  I looked back to the time when Amy
and I were girls and how different then from the present [Ardon?]
spoke and we thought very well but he told us an elder told him
he was all wrong that day  Mother not as well as usual I spent
the afternoon with her J and girls went to Henrys  Today Rachel
spoke well as she has generally done lately shorter and in
a way to encourage obedience to duty Dorinda and children
are here they have gone to Uncle Jamess since tea and I am
the only occupant of home  It is sadning [sic] to me to have the
dear children so misled as I think they are coming up in
all the formal observance of days [at home?] Minnie said
this afternoon why it dose [sic] not seem much like Sunday here
it seems most like other days I asked her what they done at
home why we go to church and then we sit down and mother
reads the bible to us – We had had reading but it had not
been the bible  It reminded me of H C W joyless Sundays I
have known a long time she would not allow them to play
how different all would have been if their father had lived
The orthodox are zealous in their first day school and they
have a bible class meet at each others house weekly
met once at Phebe Titus  Edward Rushmore is very much
interested in them and the school also Edward Hicks went
to P Titus but was not all suited told Phebe he should have
been much better satisfied had he remained at home [and?] enga
-ged in silent prayer so you see we are still earnest
some in one way and some in another we are trying
a little to get signatures to the womens petition but succeed
poorly some say slavery is virtually abolished some say congress
has no power some want to keep clear of all intermedling [sic]
that the subject is gaining and we have signed petition [so?]
(Page 4)
but what has it amounted to  Fifth day here this is yet
scarcely a minutes time have I had since first day
we have had company steadily since second day we
were out making calls and some acquaintance from Oyster
Bay came they were just gone and I had doned [sic] by visiting rig
for my working dress when we were delighted by a new
arrival W. & Mary Third day Stephen & family & Uncle James girl and
yesterday quite a company mostly of N Yorkers and strangers to you
I presume who will come to day is not known as yet Dorinda
and girls want to go to see M K Underhill this afternoon  We hope
W and Mary will come back soon  I tried to convince them we
had quite as much claim on them as any other family  Mother
is failing and I am feeling for Hannah fearing too much will
come on her  Mothers woman is away now her child is deceased
There have been many accidents but as my paper is nearly full
and I think likely Elizabeth has mentioned them  Henry Havi
-land has just lost their two oldest children only one little one
left and Valentine Seaman their youngest cousin P Haviland
is in a critical condition and they very much fear she will
not regain her health tho more comfortable just now
There [crossed out word] no epidemic but deaths are very frequent
around us  Hicks Albertson had been sick but recovered
in degree so as to attend business was taken with spasms
and died in a few hours  We have had extreme warm
weather for several weeks but night before last had a fine
rain and now the weather is delightfully cool too
cool to sit with open windows  Joseph has gone to
take some things to send to the Hospital at Fort
Schuyler there are a great many there  All supplys [sic] are
stoped [sic] being sent to Davids Island where the rebel prison
are in many instances people who had not contributed
any thing for the union wounded were anxious to give
to the rebel so it was easy to see where their sympathy was
The Draft is going on in N Y see some names that we know
among the number is Howard Wright [J?]DW son & J Wilids
R R Wilids son how our Nephews will fare is to be seen
Matilda is not al all well the root or [ilegible] [difficulty?]
in her mouth seems to be the cause  Had a letter from
Lucretia lately she spoke of the remarkable character
of the col[ored] troops said they committed no depredations whatever
and were very superior every way to the white regiments so their officers
said E M Davis has been very much interested in them Thomas Mott has
gone to Europe again  affectionately Mary
[Mary Robbins Post]

Roslyn, NY is a village in Nassau County on the north shore of Long Island
Great Neck, NY is a village in Nassau County on the north shore of Long Island
Matinecock,NY is a village located within the Town of Oyster Bay in Nassau County
Jericho, NY is a hamlet in Nassau County on the north shore of Long Island
Robert Barclay (1648-1690): Scottish Quaker; published Apology for the True Christian Divinity: Being an Explanation and Vindication of the Principles and Doctrines of the People called Quakers.  (1676 ) which set forth the tenets of the Quaker religion in the form of fifteen theses; aruged that all true knowledge comes from divine revelation and is imparted directly to the individual
Perhaps refers to Stimonson Powell, a Quaker minister from Westbury Monthly Meeting
Women’s petition: On May 14, 1863, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton called a meeting of the Women's National Loyal League. The League called for the immediate abolition of slavery and gathered signatures on petitions asking Congress to “pass at the earliest practicable day an act emancipating all persons of African descent held to involuntary service or labor in the United States."
Oyster Bay, NY: a hamlet on the north shore of Long Island in Nassau County
Fort Schuyler: located at the southeastern tip of the Bronx; includes McDougall Hospital a U.S. military hospital that treated wounded soliders during the war
Lucretia Mott(1793-1880): well-known Philadelphia Quakers; leader of the abolition and women’s rights movements
Edward Morris Davis (1818-1897): Abolitionist and Philadelphia merchant was married to James and Lucretia Mott’s daughter Maria Mott (1812-1897)
William and Mary (Post) Hallowell? daughter of Isaac and Hannah Post

About the Original Item

Date
1863-08-23
Creator
Post, Mary Robbins
Recipient
Post, Isaac, 1798-1872
Internal Identifier
1402
Subjects
Tags
, , , , ,
Collection:
Post Collection
Item Type:
Document
Citation:
Post, Mary Robbins, “Post, Mary Robbins. Letter to Isaac Post.,” Post Family Papers Project, accessed December 10, 2018, https://rbsc.library.rochester.edu/items/show/3628.